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Andreas

Savvides

Savvides studied sculpture in London at St. Martin’s School of Art and at the Chelsea School of Art (1955-1958); his tutors were B. Meadows and H. Moore. His work was influenced by his tutors and, more widely, by contemporary English sculpture. The first period of his artistic career, beginning after the end of his studies, closely follows on H. Moore’s lively, biomorphic forms. Savvides produced a series of constructivist, minimalist works around the year 1962, the pieces based on and dealing with geometric shapes. These intensely colourful sculptures bring Savvides close to the artists of the British group ‘New Generation’. In the early 70s, he reverted to the biomorphic shapes and curved surfaces of his early practice, inspired by the Cypriot landscape.

The Turkish invasion of the island in 1974 affected his visual language; hard metal objects are inserted through his curvilinear forms, opening a dialogue between soft and hard, war and peace. In his final piece, he used already sculpted pieces – natural or manufactured, that he found in the sea and were ravaged by time – to create something new. He was particularly interested in researching the relationship between fullness and emptiness and the search for harmony and balance. Besides sculpture, he also made reliefs and paintings.
 

Cypriot, 1930-2016

Andreas Savvides, Landscape, 1990, Oil on canvas, 60 x 82 cm

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